A mapping sequence for malaria and mosquito nets in Africa

Roll Back MalariaThe upcoming annual World Malaria Day on the 25th of April is one of the most visible international activities to tackle the problem of a disease that today is mainly a problem on the African continent. Beyond that day, activists from public sector as well as from many private organisations have regular meetings to find solutions for a disease that UNICEF describes as both preventable and curable. Continue reading

A Tale of Two Cities: London’s Health Inequalities

London is a special city, London is incredibly diverse and London has its own unique health problems. In 2012 the London Deanery, in partnership with the British Medical Association, is hosting a series of seminars that look to provide [...] an opportunity to debate some of the key healthcare issues that face the capital in 2012.” This extract from the announcement of the Metropolitan Medicine 2012 seminar series highlights the need to take a closer look at London’s position within the United Kingdom, as the challenges that the city faces are probably not different, but certainly unique to the problems that currently exist in the health sector of the country.
A tale of two cities: London’s health inequalities was the title of my contribution to the seminar series. In my presentation I highlighted some of the problems that are part of that issue, explaining how social and health inequalities are inevitably intertwined. London is unique in the social landscape, but also part of the processes that shape the UK, which I demonstrated in a series of maps in my slides that accompanied my talk: Continue reading

Inequalities in Immunisation

Save the Children Report CoverGlobal inequalities in health find their expression in a wide range of issues that start in the very early ages of a person’s life. Children are most at risk, as health-related problems can have implications on the rest of their life – if they survive childhood at all. Finding the Final Fifth: Inequalities in Immunisation is the title of a new report published by Save the Children in partnership with ACTION and endorsed by the World Health Organisation.
The report takes a closer look at health inequalities related to immunisation coverage. With children being highly vulnerable, no access to immunisation is one of the preventable causes of death. Further efforts such as the Global Vaccine Action Plan (pdf) are needed to tackle the problem. “Reaching the hard-to-reach must be a priority for all countries“, concludes Save the Children in a statement prior to the 65th World Health Assembly where these issues were on the agenda.
The Worldmapper project contributed a cartogram series to the report, looking at some of the data that Save the Children used in its findings. The data shows how access to health and immunisation compares to mortality rates of children and how this data gives an indication of the prevailing global inequalities. We created four maps, of which three were included in the report (the following maps are modified version of these maps). The original data sources are given in the report (download link see below). The first map shows the mortality rates of under-five year old children:

Cartogram / Map of Child Mortality under the Age of Five in the World
(click for larger version)

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Broken Hearts

Here are two maps that I created in collaboration with the Department of Cardiovascular Science at the University of Sheffield using data published by the British Heart Foundation (see http://www.heartstats.org/ for more statistics). The maps is coloured by age-standardised cardiovascular heart disease death rates per 100,000 people (split into male and female deaths). Both maps are shaded using the quintiles, thus differ in the absolute rate shown here. This reveals a picture of the prevailing health inequalities in the United Kingdom, with a quite striking North-South divide on the one hand, and an existing division within the Capital as well (East London being most affected in the South East of England). Both maps are drawn on an equal population cartogram giving each person the same amount of space on the map: Continue reading